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Thread: Great Grandfather's Gerstner Refinish

  1. #16
    He worked for Detroit Steel Productions and apparently had a large part in the invention of double hung windows.
    “Who are you to judge the life I live?
    I know I'm not perfect
    -and I don't live to be-
    but before you start pointing fingers...
    make sure you hands are clean!”

    - Robert Nesta Marley -

  2. #17
    After some research double hung windows have been around much longer than him so I assume he redesigned them or something. Need todo some more research.
    “Who are you to judge the life I live?
    I know I'm not perfect
    -and I don't live to be-
    but before you start pointing fingers...
    make sure you hands are clean!”

    - Robert Nesta Marley -

  3. #18
    So got some more clarification from my aunt. He worked for Detroit Steel and the window system he helped design is called Fenestra. May try to print one of these fliers or something for the box also. I am hoping to find some actual drawings of his!!

    “Who are you to judge the life I live?
    I know I'm not perfect
    -and I don't live to be-
    but before you start pointing fingers...
    make sure you hands are clean!”

    - Robert Nesta Marley -

  4. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Melbourne, FL, and Broad Brook, CT
    Posts
    1,722
    The name struck a note:

    fen·es·tra·tion

    [ˌfenəˈstrāSHən]




    NOUN
    architecture



    • the arrangement of windows and doors on the elevations of a building.





  5. #20
    Got the key that Terry was nice enough to send to me on loan. Unfortunately the lock is broke internally, key fits and turns, but nothing happens. I will most likely get some copies made just in case the internals can be rebuilt and salvaged.

    I am not going to replace the original lock and it is not detrimental to me if the lock does not function so I will continue with cleaning it up and see about finding someone competent enough to disassemble and repair the internals. Might have to ship it over to Terry's guy when I return his key since we are both in Florida.
    “Who are you to judge the life I live?
    I know I'm not perfect
    -and I don't live to be-
    but before you start pointing fingers...
    make sure you hands are clean!”

    - Robert Nesta Marley -

  6. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Melbourne, FL, and Broad Brook, CT
    Posts
    1,722
    How unfortunate! I thought we had a plan...

    I am not a locksmith and my local guy will not open a lock and do repairs. I do know of another guy who will but he is very expensive.

    I'm willing to bet that a P.O. pried the top open and broke the tang off the locking mechanism that engage the hook on the hasp portion. I've seen it dozens of times. There is a current case posted on the forum. I also have a bin of broken locks on my bench that display the same problem. It's not easy to weld a tiny tang back on an integral part of the lock.

    http://www.gerstnerforum.com/showthr...highlight=lock
    Last edited by user459; 07-19-2018 at 11:06 AM. Reason: add link

  7. #22
    Yeah, I saw that thread too. I am still going to keep the original lock and make a copy of the key you sent for aesthetic purposes to leave in the lock. Will get it back to you once I find a local shop that can cut it.

    Thanks a million for lending the copy!!

    Quote Originally Posted by user459 View Post
    How unfortunate! I thought we had a plan...

    I am not a locksmith and my local guy will not open a lock and do repairs. I do know of another guy who will but he is very expensive.

    I'm willing to bet that a P.O. pried the top open and broke the tang off the locking mechanism that engage the hook on the hasp portion. I've seen it dozens of times. There is a current case posted on the forum. I also have a bin of broken locks on my bench that display the same problem. It's not easy to weld a tiny tang back on an integral part of the lock.

    http://www.gerstnerforum.com/showthr...highlight=lock
    “Who are you to judge the life I live?
    I know I'm not perfect
    -and I don't live to be-
    but before you start pointing fingers...
    make sure you hands are clean!”

    - Robert Nesta Marley -

  8. #23
    Could not resist one more try with posting my latest finished project. Mahogany 52 with all new brass hardware.
    IMG_0432.jpgIMG_0089.jpg

  9. #24
    Been away for a bit as life has thrown some curve balls and haven't had much time to work on the box lately but here is where it is now in the process.

    I disassembled/removed the till top and removed all remaining hardware and the handle as well as the last of the felt.







    After finally removing the till top I was able to glue down the lifting veneer on the rear of the box by gently lifting it some more and blowing the glue into it. Terry gave me the heads up to place a layer of plastic between the veneer and the clamped wood to avoid it adhering and damaging it upon removal. He recommended to use a plastic sheet but in a pinch a gallon freezer bag did the trick

    “Who are you to judge the life I live?
    I know I'm not perfect
    -and I don't live to be-
    but before you start pointing fingers...
    make sure you hands are clean!”

    - Robert Nesta Marley -

  10. #25
    Once the glue had set up I unclamped and cleaned up any residual glue remaining and started the stripping process. I went with Citristrip since it has less fumes and I am working in a small place, plus I was hoping it would help to remove some of the smell as well as the finish.







    “Who are you to judge the life I live?
    I know I'm not perfect
    -and I don't live to be-
    but before you start pointing fingers...
    make sure you hands are clean!”

    - Robert Nesta Marley -

  11. #26
    The instructions stated you could leave it on for 30 minutes minimum and up to 24 hrs. I applied the Citristrip in the morning before work in hopes it would sit all day and remove all the original finish while I was @ work. Came home and when I opened the garage door I could see what appeared to be a stripped box.









    What you actually see is the dried remains of the Citristrip that turned to this blonde color(truth is I actually really liked how it made the grain look like this). At this point I decided that this product could not be left on that long and had to wait for the weekend to try stripping again.
    “Who are you to judge the life I live?
    I know I'm not perfect
    -and I don't live to be-
    but before you start pointing fingers...
    make sure you hands are clean!”

    - Robert Nesta Marley -

  12. #27
    Since my first attempt to rush the stripping before I was ready I had some time to figure out how to remove the flip up drawer cover, which is much easier than I was expecting. You basically push one side in while the other is all the way out and it wedges itself out. Pretty simple but I was terrified I was going to have to break something or disassemble it to accomplish this.

    Second round of stripping was much more successful and only letting it sit for 45 minutes at a time and also doing one side at a time to avoid drying issues. Finish came off wonderfully and the almost 100 year old oak looks amazing. Still debating on if I am going to "bleach" the wood to get it even lighter before refinishing.









    I have also done a little bit of sanding on this after it dried from the stripping. Basically just trying to soften some of the rough edges and smooth out the corners from years of being banged up. I am using soft sanding sponges and always sanding with the grain to avoid any cross scratches.

    You do not see the till top and fold up drawer cover stripped because I am waiting for another weekend off of work to attack those and to finish stripping the drawer faces.
    “Who are you to judge the life I live?
    I know I'm not perfect
    -and I don't live to be-
    but before you start pointing fingers...
    make sure you hands are clean!”

    - Robert Nesta Marley -

  13. #28
    Now that all the hardware/metal has been removed I could start on the rust removal. I was not able to locate a Sonic Jewelry cleaner as Terry had recommended but I was not in a rush so I did not see the need to expedite rust removal by using one. Rustoleum rust remover was what I was able to find locally and it worked great besides two issues.

    1. I placed all my original drawer knob backerplates in and found out the rust remover was too strong for them and they are now destroyed. And not just damaged but disintegrated!!!!

    2. I also placed the finger pull from the flip up drawer cover in the rust remover and destroyed it as well.


    So my rust removal results were pretty good I guess besides the loss of some original items but I guess I'll have to replace them with newer. Here are my before and after shots for the hardware.






    Also on the handle brackets I noticed it was stamped with something once some of the rust was removed. It says "PATD SEPT. 14 1909"

    “Who are you to judge the life I live?
    I know I'm not perfect
    -and I don't live to be-
    but before you start pointing fingers...
    make sure you hands are clean!”

    - Robert Nesta Marley -

  14. #29
    Some close ups of the hardware after rust removal. Still have not polished them up and tried to smooth out some of the issues from decades of rust but I did buy some white polishing compound and it just barely smoother out the one corner bracket I tested it on. Was also using my electric drill so not sure if it had enough power to actually do what I was trying for, probably need some stronger compounds too, any suggestions??






    “Who are you to judge the life I live?
    I know I'm not perfect
    -and I don't live to be-
    but before you start pointing fingers...
    make sure you hands are clean!”

    - Robert Nesta Marley -

  15. #30
    Next things I will be doing are:

    1. Finish stripping the drawers.

    2. Stripping the till top and flip up drawer cover. Both will need some repairs as well.

    3. Start polishing and trying to smooth out some sharp edges and parts of the hardware.


    That is the short list for the near future as well as trying to order some new felt and the parts that I destroyed during rust removal. Will also be sending Terry his loaner key back along with the original handle to be refinished in some new leather.

    I am itching to get this box completed and together to see how it looks, I never take this long with projects usually so its killing me. LOL
    “Who are you to judge the life I live?
    I know I'm not perfect
    -and I don't live to be-
    but before you start pointing fingers...
    make sure you hands are clean!”

    - Robert Nesta Marley -

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