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Thread: Aging Hardware

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Aging Hardware

    So I'm the new guy to the forum. Not really a collector or restorer, but I appreciate quality and over the years have managed to acquire 3 Gerstner chest at various times.
    So, my first question is that I have to replace the lock on an O52 chest from the early 70's and was wondering if anyone has a trick to "age" the lock so it blends in a bit better with the rest of the hardware rather than showing up as this bright shiny new part.
    Thanks all

  2. #2
    That's a switch! We're used to giving tip on how to make old hardware look new, not the other way around! I understand what you are saying. A new lock on an old chest with restored hardware would look too new. I'm not sure how to get an aged patina on new nickel plating without roughing it up and buffing the heck out of it. On the rare occasion when I have replaced a lock with a new one, I have just installed it and let time do its job.

  3. #3
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    Dracut Massachusetts
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    I used 1200 emery cloth followed by green scotch brite to scuff up the surface. Then I cleaned with alcohol and put the hardware in a small shallow Tupperware container and then put that container, without lid, in a larger Tupperware container. I put about a half inch of white vinegar in the large container, NOT in the one with hardware, and put the lid on the big Tupperware for a few hours.

    This is is a new lock from Gerstner, next to a new hinge for comparison.
    image.jpg

  4. #4
    Wow! Thanks Dave. That looks like it does the job.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
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    Dave, Thanks for the information. I'd found something similar on an electric guitar forum, but not quite so informative.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
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    So I tried Dave's method and it worked quite well after around 2 hours. Just a word of caution, leaving the hardware exposed for a longer period of time.....like 5 hours....and the nickel plating on the corners begins to disappear exposing the copper (?) underneath. The voice of experience.

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